Not Long Until The Lincoln Christmas Market

We love the Lincoln Christmas Market, and not just because it’s the most wonderful time of the year!

Our contemporary Cathedral city boasts more than 2,000 years of history and is the perfect place to visit over the festive period. The medieval square provides the perfect back drop for the Lincoln Christmas Market but more importantly, it’s right outside our doors.

From its small beginnings in 1982, the Christmas Market now includes more than 200 stalls and is expected to attract an incredible 250,000 visitors to Lincoln.

The market began when Lincoln twinned with Germany town Neustadt and the German link is still strong, with stall holders from our twinned-town bringing German crafts, food and drink to the market. The twinning relationship with Lincoln was formed in 1969 and is one of the oldest, strongest and most successful in the country. Although the first German Christmas Market didn’t take place until 1982, it was still one of the first in the country and today it’s one of the largest.

It’s the perfect place for anyone on the hunt for beautiful, hand-crafted presents that enable you to gift something truly unique. Visitors to the market will find a treasure trove of goodies and should expect to see jewellery, hand-poured candles, wooden toys, hand-painted glass, ceramics, photographs and locally-created art and fabulous fresh produce.

‘We really enjoy the Christmas Market coming to Lincoln each year,’ says White Hart Hotel general manager Ian Robinson. ‘It’s a massive event that we’re all very proud of in the city and is the perfect way to kick-start Christmas.’

The Lincoln Christmas Market starts on Thursday 7 December and runs until Sunday 10 December. Click here for more information.

If you are heading to the Christmas Market, don’t forget to pop in for one of our famous hot chocolates to enjoy as you rest your feet and warm your cockles.

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WHITE HART HOTEL IS AWARDED BEST RESTAURANT IN LINCOLN

The White Hart Hotel is delighted to have won the prestigious Select Lincolnshire Food, Drink and Hospitality Awards in the Best Venue and Best Restaurant categories.

The multi-award winning White Hart Hotel added to last year’s Hotel of the Year award having been shortlisted in three categories and went on to scoop the two top prizes at this year’s event. The awards, now in their third year, recognise the very best in Lincolnshire’s food, drink and hospitality industries.

Ian Robinson, White Hart Hotel general manager, said: ‘This is fantastic recognition of the great work we do at the White Hart Hotel and to have added to last year’s Hotel of the Year award is a massive achievement.

‘Winning Restaurant of the Year and Venue of the Year is a tremendous honour. We’re very proud that we’ve won awards two years in a row and would like to thank all the staff and team who have helped us achieve our goal of becoming Lincoln’s leading venue. We work hard to ensure all our customers experience unparalleled service and enjoy excellent food, so it’s great to get recognition for that with these two prestigious awards.’

This year saw the White Hart Hotel reopen the newly refurbished Grille restaurant in the heart of historic Lincoln’s Cathedral Quarter, serving high-quality local produce with views of Lincoln Cathedral.

www.whitehart-lincoln.co.uk

 

Battle of Lincoln 800th Anniversary: What’s On?

The 20th May is the 800th anniversary of the Battle of Lincoln. Deemed by historians to be one of the most significant conflicts in Medieval England, there is so much going on across the city to mark the occasion.

A little bit of history

Let’s start by looking at just why the Battle of Lincoln was so important. Back in 1215, the Magna Carta was sealed, yet just 10 weeks later, King John began to rebel against the promises made. This resulted in a division between English royalists and the rebels who called for Prince Louis (the son of the French king) to take to the throne. The divide led the country into civil war and when King John died in 1216, his nine-year-old son Henry III took on the reign of a divided and hostile country.

It was in 1217 that these hostilities came to a head. Aside from Lincoln Castle, the whole city of Lincoln had been invaded by the French. William Marshal (Henry III’s protector) led a troop of royalist knights to the castle, where they resisted the invasion. The royalists were victorious, leading Prince Louis to return to France – saving Lincoln, and England, from French rule.

What’s On? 

To commemorate, there’s a whole host of events and activities taking place all over the city…

BGU Annual History Lecture – 17th May 2017
Learn all about the circumstances that led to the conflict and the details of the Battle from Dr. Sean McGlynn. Bishop Grosseteste University is less than a 15 minute walk (or four minute drive) from our hotel. Why not join us for a relaxing drink after exercising those brain cells?

Lincoln Knights Trail – 20th May – 4th September 2017
Follow the trail of 36 knight sculptures across Lincoln. The sculptures depict two of the central figures of the Battle of Lincoln: William Marshal and Nichola de la Haye (custodian of Lincoln Castle).

Preparing for Battle (Lincoln Castle) – 20th – 21st May 2017
Head to the royalist hub at Lincoln Castle to watch the king’s army get ready for battle. From the preparation of bows and arrows to King Henry III’s arrival, you’ll be right at the heart of the action.

Procession – 20th May 2017
At 1.30pm on the anniversary, you can join the procession of flags and shields through the streets of Lincoln. Starting at Stonebow & Guildhall, you’ll proceed up Steep Hill to Lincoln Cathedral, arriving in time for the re-enactment.

(There’s also the opportunity to make your own shield at workshops across the city in the morning. See workshops here.)

Family Cycle Ride – 20th May 2017 
A team of riders will be cycling from William Marshal’s grave in London to Newark on 17-19th May.

On Battle Day, they’ll cycle the route of Marshal’s knights from Newark to Lincoln – you can join them on the final stretch on a family-friendly bike ride.

Re-enactment – 20th May 2017
The day’s events culminate in a re-enactment of the Battle of Lincoln. Gather on Castle Hill from 2pm to see the events unfold.

Special Discounts 

To commemorate 800 years since the Battle of Lincoln, we’ll be offering the first 800 lunchtime diners 10% off their final bill when they dine at The White Hart Hotel. See full details on our offers page.

(For more information on the history of the Battle of Lincoln, read the Visit Lincoln blog.) 

The History of The White Hart Hotel

Situated in the historic Cathedral Quarter of Lincoln, The White Hart Hotel is over 600 years old. First opened in the 14th century as a coaching inn, the hotel sits between the Norman Castle and the city’s Medieval Cathedral, making it a fantastic location for visitors who are keen to experience Lincoln’s history and witness the beauty of Roman architecture and design.

The hotel is famous for being the meeting place for Sir William Tritton and Major W G Wilson in September 1915 – they together conceived of and created the first ever prototype military tank in what became known as the ‘Tank Room’, which is now a corporate boardroom on the first floor of the hotel. Thanks to their design skills the world’s first 200 tanks were manufactured in Lincoln.

An attractive mixture of old and new, the hotel is also known for its ghostly history and is synonymous with spirits and ghouls. The legend is that a highwayman was killed in the area of the hotel that used to be the stables many years ago and he now haunts the restaurant area, hiding his face with his cloak!

Lincoln Castle is just a short walk from the hotel entrance and is home to one of only four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, a Victorian prison and an archaeology exhibition. This year, a ceramic poppies sculpture will be exhibited at the castle until September to commemorate the Battle of the Somme. Originally a part of the installation Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red at the Tower of London in the autumn of 2014, the poppy sculpture (known as the Wave and Weeping Window) is just a short walk away from the Cathedral where visitors can inscribe and leave behind crosses with the names of their lost loved ones.